By Taylor Starks

Issues of race and culture remain at the center of many controversial and conflicting conversations within our society. The political, medical and social justice systems tend to highlight significant disparities among minority groups, but our social services sector also displays a grim reality.

The marginalization of minority groups impacts a variety of areas within the social service sector, but it has the greatest impact on a very vulnerable population: foster children.

64% of African American children who entered the foster care system remained for a period greater than 2 years...”

The foster care system is inundated with children from a variety of backgrounds.  Historically, there has been a great disproportionality of African American children who are a part of this system, leaving many to ask the question, “Why?” Locally, many African American children who enter into the foster care system remain for several years before the possibility of adoption or reunification become a reality. In 2014, 64% of African American children who entered the foster care system remained for a period greater than 2 years, with only 7% being adopted.

While transracial adoption has proven to be successful, many caregivers are hesitant and unsure of how to approach this issue. Questions like “what if this child resents me?” “how do I care for them?” and “what do they truly need?” create a fear in approaching the unknown, leaving many children in the shadows.

Many caregivers are hesitant and unsure of how to approach this issue

Meet the Jones Family.

The Jones had a desire to love on children regardless of their background, but encountered some challenges in discovering how that love would be manifested in the life of their son Omari. Despite the challenge and the controversy that the adoption of their son caused, they were willing to take on the tough issues, navigate the awkward conversations and seek to provide an undying care for their child. Listen to their story and see how transracial adoption not only transforms the life a child, but the life of an entire family.

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